The Bach floral remedies

The Bach floral remedies

The Bach floral remedies represent a therapeutic method developed by a known British bacteriologist and homeopath, Edward Bach. He believed dew drops found on flowers, while in contact with the natural sunrays, captured their healing properties. Initially, doctor Bach used the remedies for pathologies he believed had an underlying spiritual cause, depression, anxiety, insomnia and stress included.

Remedii florale BachA proper floral remedy contains a mean amount of “floral material” diluted in 1/1 water and alcohol solution (there is a hypothesis according to which the alcohol was distilled from wine). The amount of “floral material” is so slight that it was believed the effect of the remedy was owed to the vibrational (energetic) content transmitted to the patient on the basis of the so-called principle of the water memory. Each remedy is used as such or in combination with other floral remedies, considering its efficiency was valid in veterinary therapeutics also. The administration is made by placing 2 to 4 drops under the tongue or by adding a similar quantity in a glass of spring water consumed during a day time.

Doctor Bach identified and developed a series of 38 remedies addressing 7 categories of negative emotions to be treated – alchemized. Despite the fact these categories of emotional “pathologies” are well defined, we let the list opened bearing in mind the idea of not confining certain “defining concepts-elements” to the interpretation they are immediate perceptions (primary, indivisible, not subject to variation):

  • Fear (known fears, shyness, uncontrolled mania, nightmares, anxiety, etc.);
  • Loneliness (indifference, impatience, self-obsession, visceral/apriori rejection of other opinions/visions/believes, etc.);
  • Hesitation (mood changes, hesitations induced by past disappointments, lack of satisfaction and motivation, etc.);
  • Hypersensitivity (hidden problems-pathologies, with possible underlying subconscious causes, obsessive preoccupation of being liked by others, symptoms hinting on lack of adaptability to the given environments, etc.);
  • Excessive preoccupation with other people (acute/chronic tendencies of possessiveness, self-absorption, self-pity, paternal-maternal behavior, etc.);
  • Addiction–desperation (partial or complete lack of self-esteem, guilt directly/indirectly oriented to one’s own person, pathological preference for overwhelming responsibilities, bitterness, resentment derived from all justifiable/unjustifiable causes, frustrations offered by feelings of shame and destitution of all kinds);
  • Lack of interest in the present moment (lack of focus, nostalgia and home sickness, apathy and resignation, lack of vitality and exhaustion, worriedness, melancholy, state of failure generated by repeated mistakes).